NiteRider http://www.niterider.com Technical Illumination Wed, 27 Aug 2014 17:51:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 MiNewt.250 Product Test http://www.niterider.com/minewt-250-product-test/ http://www.niterider.com/minewt-250-product-test/#comments Wed, 01 Dec 2010 12:27:31 +0000 http://niteriderspanish.com/?p=818 From singletrack.com The MiNewt.250 features three light levels and a flash mode, and run time is claimed to be 2.5 hours on high, 3.5 hours on medium and 4.5 hours on low. The light comes with a toolless ratcheting handlebar mount that fits bars up to 31.8mm as well as a helmet mount. The light...

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From singletrack.com
The MiNewt.250 features three light levels and a flash mode, and run time is claimed to be 2.5 hours on high, 3.5 hours on medium and 4.5 hours on low. The light comes with a toolless ratcheting handlebar mount that fits bars up to 31.8mm as well as a helmet mount. The light itself can be removed from either mount via a sliding-style quick release, allowing them to be left in place.

Charging is stated to take 4.5 hours, and uses a USB-to-mini-USB cord to do so, with an optional USB-to-AC wall adapter.

Likes:
Nite Rider’s MiNewt 250 Cordless looks like an old commuter light I used to have that had its stock 6-watt bulb swapped out with a cutting-edge, high-performance 10-watt halogen bulb.

Envy of the neighborhood that old one was, but short of general size and cordless design, the MiNewt 250 is more than just a way to avoid getting a ticket from a bored cop while riding home from a night out. No, the MiNewt 250 is an actual trail-worthy, self-contained unit that can easily be swapped from bike to bike without the use of tools.

For the claimed 250 lumen, this light puts out a truly impressive beam. And while a light of this output shouldn’t be compared to a 900-lumen light, since we were testing both the Exposure Diablo and this Nite Rider at the same time, I’d put the MiNewt 250 in the ballpark of the Diablo, even if it’s out in left field.

The biggest difference? Beam pattern has a noticeable bright center that quickly fades into a dimmer but consistent and wide halo with a definite border to the pattern. In reality, this wasn’t enough of a diminishment in light to avoid the same trails ridden with brighter, more expensive lights, but it did curb speed a bit in twistier or more technical sections.

Claimed run times are ridiculously underrated from Nite Rider as I consistently got 3.5 hours at the highest setting, and with any conserving by switching to the middle or low setting, the little guy lasted longer than I wanted it to.

NITE RIDER MINEWT 250

  • MSRP: $129.99
  • Weight: 190 grams
  • Output: 250 lumen
  • Battery: Lithium Ion

Warranty: Two years on electrical components, 180 on the battery
Speaking of switching between light levels, the difference in potency between high and medium is minimal, which allows the option to preserve battery life on mellow trail sections without feeling like you’re riding by braille. Low beam isn’t as bad as you’d expect on a 250-lumen light, but does drop into more of a bailout option.

Handlebar mounting is easy, and allows for both quick release of the light-only, or the light and handlebar mount combo in one fell swoop. The ratcheting mount also makes swapping from, say, mountain bike to townie to road bike quick and easy. The helmet mount works well in a universal way with the somewhat standard dual-vent straps, dense foam pad and ratcheting beam angle (up and down) adjustment. And again, it’s easy to remove the light itself, leaving the mount in place.

Having the ability to charge the MiNewt.250 off a computer is great, not only because I find myself in front of a computer more often than I’d like to admit, but it also omits one more electronics cord in the pile. Well, at least in my world of multiple cameras, GPS units, and cycle computers that all use the same cord.

Dislikes:
As handy and conveniently tool-free as the handlebar mount is, it’s hard to cinch down tight enough to keep the light from shaking and vibrating while riding trail It’s not terrible, but annoying none the less to have a jittery headlight through the rough stuff.

Though less than 1/2 a pound, I thought the MiNewt.250 rode a bit heavy on top of a helmet.

Noted:
We were never “lucky” enough to test this light in the elements, but it passed the faucet test, and has a little attached rubber plug for the charge port, so our guess is that it’ll be fine in poor conditions.

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NiteRider Pro 600 LED Review http://www.niterider.com/niterider-pro-600-led-review/ http://www.niterider.com/niterider-pro-600-led-review/#comments Mon, 01 Nov 2010 20:12:57 +0000 http://niteriderspanish.com/?p=998 From bicycletimesmag.com Everyone seems to have different needs in a light. I’ve used a lot of different lights in my riding career, and a few were close, but never quite there in terms of modes. Often I wanted a slower flash, or just high and low settings, or I wasn’t happy with the button push...

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From bicycletimesmag.com
Everyone seems to have different needs in a light. I’ve used a lot of different lights in my riding career, and a few were close, but never quite there in terms of modes. Often I wanted a slower flash, or just high and low settings, or I wasn’t happy with the button push sequence. The Pro 600 LED light addresses these problems with NiteRider’s DIY software. Plug the light head into your PC (Mac version coming soon!) and fiddle around with modes to your heart’s content. The 600 nomenclature specifies the LED’s lumens, and a dual lamp version is called, predictably enough, the Pro 1200.

Construction is typical for NiteRider: built for the long haul. There are a lot of older NiteRider lights still in service, and build quality is the reason why. The Redbull-can-sized battery pack is on the beefy side, but it gives the light an estimated four hours of runtime on the highest light output. It can be mounted on the top or down tube, or tossed in your pack; personally it seems too heavy and sharp-edged for my jersey pockets. I did have some trouble getting the battery pack to stay in place on my mountain bike’s squarish top tube, but that was no problem on round tubes. Handlebar and helmet mounts for the light head are easy to adjust; the handlebar mount in particular stands out as simple and super-adjustable for just about any bend, sweep, or rise.

The software is intuitive to use, and changes to the program can be made in minutes. The light can be programmed with up to five modes—one stock setting and four modifiable settings. Each mode has both a steady and flash sub-mode, and within each sub-mode, various light levels and flash patterns can be set. Once set, modes can be selected without hooking up the light to the computer. For example: I set up two modes, “commuting” and “off-road.” In “commuting” I have three light levels (600, 300, and 150 lumens) and a few flash modes, including one I set myself. “Off-road” has two light levels (600 and 150 lumens), low for climbing, high for everything else. I also programmed two flashes, a basic riding–in-traffic flash and an SOS mode, because you never know where the day may take you.

The light pattern is just about perfect for commuting, a bright round center with enough peripheral light to keep me aware of the side of the road. A little wider beam would be my preference for off-road use, but that is a pretty minor quibble. The single button was easy to push with gloves on, and the LED fuel gauge was easy to read. Switching between steady and flash modes requires a three-second push of the button, and the light will go off for a moment when switching modes. Switching between custom modes is a little confusing; reading the manual is recommended, probably something I don’t need to tell the nerd-types that will be attracted to this light. (I include myself in that group.)

LED lights are on a tear. I wasn’t even able to finish this review before NiteRider bumped up brightness a little more and renamed the light the Pro 700. It seems like every six months run times increase, along with light output, and prices remain about the same, or go down. This is a good time to be a cyclist in the dark. I’m pretty stoked about this light, and will be glad to have something this bright for the upcoming dark commutes as winter approaches, and won’t shy away from hitting some nighttime singletrack when the opportunity presents itself. MSRP $500, proudly made in the U.S.A.

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NiteRider Stinger Rear Blinkie http://www.niterider.com/niterider-stinger-rear-blinkie/ http://www.niterider.com/niterider-stinger-rear-blinkie/#comments Thu, 28 Oct 2010 20:17:36 +0000 http://niteriderspanish.com/?p=1003 From urbanvelo.org The low-profile Niterider Stinger has quickly become my go-to rear blinkie since it showed up for review a couple of months back. The silicone body and stretchy quick release strap make it easy to switch bike to bike, or remove when parked for anything more than a few minutes. It fits just about...

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From urbanvelo.org
The low-profile Niterider Stinger has quickly become my go-to rear blinkie since it showed up for review a couple of months back. The silicone body and stretchy quick release strap make it easy to switch bike to bike, or remove when parked for anything more than a few minutes. It fits just about any size post including aero profile versions, though sits at a fixed angle so isn’t well suited for seatstay, helmet or other creative placements. The 1/2 watt LED is as bright as it gets, with a sturdy lens that functions as the on/off switch too. Click it to cycle through the simple three modes – off, steady and an eye catching blink.

I prefer lights like the Stinger that I can easily turn on/off while riding for those times I take off without thinking, but many times this comes at the expense of a blinkie that switches on in pockets and bags when off the bike and the Stinger suffer the same fate. While I’ve had stretchy light mounting o-rings just fall apart on me in the past, the band with the Stinger seems solid enough after some abuse and overstretching, and is easy replaceable (and potentially easily lost) as it isn’t attached to the light body on either side. Niterider has a history of supporting their products, so I’d expect such replacement to be available with a simple email. Expect about 80 hours of flashing out of the CR2032 battery, a bit less in the cold. Overall, I like it and keep moving it bike to bike as I run errands or ride home from polo. For $20 I’d say this is a solid choice for an easy-on, easy-off rear blinkie.

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MiNewt.350 LED Product Review http://www.niterider.com/minewt-350-led-product-review/ http://www.niterider.com/minewt-350-led-product-review/#comments Mon, 09 Aug 2010 20:22:21 +0000 http://niteriderspanish.com/?p=1010 From singletracks.com My last experience with NiteRider’s big 1200 rig left me with stars in my eyes, so I was eager to test a light that is a little more modest, a little less glam-rock, and quite a bit lighter on the wallet. On Friday night I got the chance to test out the MiNewt.350,...

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From singletracks.com
My last experience with NiteRider’s big 1200 rig left me with stars in my eyes, so I was eager to test a light that is a little more modest, a little less glam-rock, and quite a bit lighter on the wallet. On Friday night I got the chance to test out the MiNewt.350, a new and improved addition to NiteRider’s 2011 series of bike lights. On the trail, on my bike, and in my hand, this little baby brought some serious firepower.

The Niterider MiNewt.350 punches out three brightness settings: high mode at 350 lumens, medium at 180 lumens, and low at 100 lumens with expected battery life of two hours, four hours, and nine hours respectively. As with all the other NiteRider lights, the MiNewt.350 has the sweet smell of high-quality manufacturing and durability. The rubber cables are thick and resilient, and the aluminum lamp housing has a sturdy feel and a nice coat of paint. This light is obviously made to last.

The 350 system doesn’t include an extension cable or a helmet mount right out of the box so initially you’ll have to mount it to the bars. Using the included cables, the battery, which is about the size of a Hostess Ho Ho, has to be mounted on the bars or stem within about 8 inches of the light. The 350 light style uses rubber o-rings that wrap around your handlebars to keep the light mounted on, essentially rubber-banding it into place. The small mount under the headlamp is about the size of a quarter and is concave so it seats flush against the round tubing of your bars. The mount also allows the light to rotate so you can twist left or right a little bit to line up your beam. Bottom line, the system is designed so it can be attached and removed quickly from your bike – I was able to set up the light on my bike in about 45 seconds.

I took the MiNewt.350 out to my favorite trail, a 6-mile, flow country, roller coaster of roots and leaves that was perfect terrain to see if this light was going to hold up to real use in the back woods. At about 9pm, I pressed the ignition button. The 350’s reflector seemed to offer a nice mix of a flood and a spot light, leaning a little bit more toward flood. When the beam was aimed about twenty feet in front of me, it lit up about eight feet of trail from side to side, and gave me a reasonably good impression of what was coming at my wheels. I did have some trouble with visibility on tight corners and hairpin turns, but I was able to ride through them as long as I went slowly. Without going into too much detail of my experience, the 350 alone was more than sufficient to get along on a cross-country trail, as long as you are riding carefully. However, without additional lighting, racing on this would be quite a challenge.

I am left with the impression that the 350 falls somewhere between a pro racing lighting system and the best commuter lighting system, filling what I call “the fun zone.” The MiNewt.350 will certainly serve your commuting needs because it is bright and extremely easy to install and remove from your bike but it also rocks the trails when the sky turns dark. It is tiny and light enough to carry in a cargo pocket or throw in your bike bag just in case your afternooner turns into evening under the dark canopy of the forest. Some riders may undervalue the benefits of ease of use and quality of build, but for me, at $199 MSRP and a mere 230 grams, the MiNewt.350 is a steal.

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NiteRider Lights Debuts 2011 Models http://www.niterider.com/niterider-lights-debuts-2011-models/ http://www.niterider.com/niterider-lights-debuts-2011-models/#comments Wed, 07 Jul 2010 20:26:57 +0000 http://niteriderspanish.com/?p=1016 From bikerumor.com Niterider’s 2011 range is an impressive mix of updates and new products, covering everything from commuter and casual riding to seriously bright endurance racing lights like the Pro 1400 pictured above. Starting with the big guns, Niterider has upped the lumen output of their two Pro series lights to 1400 and 700 (from...

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From bikerumor.com
Niterider’s 2011 range is an impressive mix of updates and new products, covering everything from commuter and casual riding to seriously bright endurance racing lights like the Pro 1400 pictured above.

Starting with the big guns, Niterider has upped the lumen output of their two Pro series lights to 1400 and 700 (from 1200 and 600 respectively). The Pro 1400 uses a dual LED frame with one spot and one flood, and it’s output is customizable via their DIY Software, letting you create your own custom output settings for various button pushes. To clarify, total output is programmable per mode, you can’t alter the flood output versus spot output.

System weight is 812g, and the battery comes with a quick release bike mount, allowing you to leave the mount on the bike and quickly pull the battery on and off for easier charging between transitions (which also means you don’t have to undo Run time ranges from 2:30hr – 64:00 hours depending on usage, charge time is 4.5hours.

The Pro 1400 light unit comes with bar and helmet mounts (shown below), and will also fit on their Explorer headband. The battery is an 8-cell Li-Ion pack, and the set comes with charger kit and computer dock to sync up with the DIY software, a free download from Niterider’s website.

The DIY software lets you create four distinct profiles, which you can name however you want (“commute”, “race”, etc.), and within each of those profiles you can create up to seven different modes with each profile. During riding, you can change the profile by holding the button down for three seconds and toggle between profiles. Once chosen, you just tap the button quickly to switch between modes. When you turn the light on, the battery indicator lights correspond to the profile you’re in. Unfortunately for those of us that think different, DIY only works with Windows…Mac users are S.O.L.

The Pro 700 comes in two versions, regular and “Race”, with the difference being a smaller, lighter battery for the Race model. The standard version comes with a 6-cell Li-Ion battery good for 4 to 48 hours of run time with a system weight of 605g and 3.5hour charge time.

The Race model gets a 4-cell battery with a 2:40 hr to 32 hr run time and system weight of 505g and 3 hour charge time.

Both versions of the 700 utilize the DIY software and come with helmet and bar mounts, charging kit and computer dock. From the looks of it, the helmet mount uses the same strap system as the GoPro cameras, which is excellent.

niterider-pro-700-helmet-bicycle-light-290x273The Pro 700 will retail for $499 and the Pro 700 Race for $399. Personally, I’d say just dump three ounces of water from your pack to make up the weight difference and go with the bigger battery. You know you always carry too much water anyway.

Bridging the gap between full race performance and just hitting the trails at night is the forthcoming MiNewt 700 Dual. It’s boosted from the previous model and lets you run one or both lights depending on your needs, which spreads power over 2 to 18 hours. Besides the power bump, the Dual now comes with a splitter cable, so you can run one or both on your bike, making it a great back up system during races and or a full fledged trail light on friendly rides. The system with both lights attached weighs in at 490g, and just 390g with one light and the 4-cell Li-Ion battery pack. It’ll retail for $299.

The single unit MiNewt 350 (above) is basically half the 700 Dual with a smaller battery, but it gets a massive 75% increase in light over last year’s model, and it goes from two settings to three for more control over light output and battery savings. Run times are 2:15 on high / 4:00 on medium / 9:00 on low. System weight is a mere 232g with the 2-cell Li-Ion battery. It retails for $199.

Both MiNewt systems use a new multi-chip LED light to generate big brightness from small packages.

Combining aspects of trail lights (brightness) with commuter lights (easy portability), the all-new MiNewt 250 Cordless pumps out a solid 250 lumens, more than enough for commuting and plenty of backup lighting to get you out of the woods without having to strap on an additional battery pack to your bike. Run times range from 2:30 to 4:30 or pretty much forever on Flash mode.

Like many of Niterider’s high end lights, the 250 Cordless (and the 150 below) uses a combination of reflector and Borofloat lens to shape the light pattern, which Niterider says does a better job for cycling applications than relying on a reflector alone. Both models use an internal Li-Ion battery and use a USB charging cable, but only the 250 includes a helmet mount, too.

The only difference between the 250 and 150 is the light output and that the 150 gets the white color. Run times are 30 to 90 minutes longer on the 150. Oh, and it’s $30 cheaper.

niterider-mini-and-mini-plus-600x459-300x229The Niterider MiNewt Mini 150 USB and Mini 150 USB-Plus (shown on helmet) jump from 110 lumens on the original model to 150 lumens. They include three modes plus flashing, have a low-battery indicator and run times from 3 to 6 hours.

They weigh in at just 175g and use a separate battery pack that connects via cable. Both can be recharged in 4 hours via USB or a wall outlet, and the Plus model comes with a helmet mount and 36″ extension cable. The MiNewt Mini and Plus are $89 and $109 respectively.

For the casual commuter, the new Lightning Bug lights come in an array of colors and are offered in one, two and three bulb models:

All are white LED lights, only the cases are colored. The 1.0 and 2.0 models have steady/flash modes and the 3.0 (right) has high/low/flash modes. Run times range from 100 to 160 hours. Pricing is $11.99, $14.99 and $19.99.

niterider-stinger-bicycle-flashing-tail-light-300x253For the rear, there’s the new Stinger tail light. It has a 1/2 watt LED that should be visible from a half mile away, and its easy on/off strap works on both round and aero seatposts. MSRP is $19.99, and you can get a combo pack with the Stinger and Lightning Bug 3.0 for $34.99.

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NiteRider Unveils 2011 Line of Bicycle Lights http://www.niterider.com/niterider-unveils-2011-line-of-bicycle-lights/ http://www.niterider.com/niterider-unveils-2011-line-of-bicycle-lights/#comments Wed, 16 Jun 2010 20:28:26 +0000 http://niteriderspanish.com/?p=1024 From mtbr.com Regarded as the leader in quality bicycle lights, NiteRider Technical Lighting debuted the 2011 line of high-end, race-ready lights and a complete line of commuter products today. Evident throughout the entire line are advances in LED technology and trademark NiteRider innovative design, providing increased performance at a decrease in MSRP. Founded in 1989,...

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From mtbr.com
Regarded as the leader in quality bicycle lights, NiteRider Technical Lighting debuted the 2011 line of high-end, race-ready lights and a complete line of commuter products today. Evident throughout the entire line are advances in LED technology and trademark NiteRider innovative design, providing increased performance at a decrease in MSRP.

Founded in 1989, NiteRider has built the company reputation on design, engineering and cutting edge products to provide serious light capabilities to the adventure sport athlete. Mike Ely, Sales and Marketing Director, explained that light and battery technology is evolving at a fast pace. As technology continues to advance and decrease in price, we are working to bring the best and most durable lighting solutions to even our entry-level lights. Our goal this year was to provide riders more bang for the buck in each one of our products.

The Pro Series and widely popular MiNewt Series return, boosted by significant increases in light output. Exciting new editions include the MiNewt.150 Cordless and 250. These modular, one-piece units are rechargeable through a wall outlet or USB, making them ideal performance lights for commuters. The MiNewt Mini jumps to 150 lumens of light output, includes multiple light levels and flash, at a decrease in price to $89.99. With bicycle commuting on the rise, NiteRider is offering a complete line of lights ranging from the hardcore bike commuter to customers wanting convenient, fun, safe lights. The Lightning Bug Series has been added for 2010, ranging in price from $11.99 to $34.99 and sporting six fun colors.

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NiteRider Introduces New Models for 2011 http://www.niterider.com/niterider-introduces-new-models-for-2011/ http://www.niterider.com/niterider-introduces-new-models-for-2011/#comments Thu, 03 Jun 2010 20:30:49 +0000 http://niteriderspanish.com/?p=1029 From bicycleretailer.com Amongst the highlights of NiteRider’s line for 2011 are two new additions—the MiNewt Cordless 150 and 250 (both pictured). The biggest difference between these lights and the regular MiNewt is the fact that it’s an inclusive one-piece light. “So for the commuter, or for someone that just wants to pull it off their...

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From bicycleretailer.com
Amongst the highlights of NiteRider’s line for 2011 are two new additions—the MiNewt Cordless 150 and 250 (both pictured).

The biggest difference between these lights and the regular MiNewt is the fact that it’s an inclusive one-piece light. “So for the commuter, or for someone that just wants to pull it off their bike real quick,” said Mike Ely, director of sales and marketing for NiteRider. The 150 (white color only) retails for $99, while the 250 (black color only) retails for $129. Key features include high, low and flash settings, low battery indicator and USB rechargeable.

“The reason why we did [this light] is because the technology has caught up to where we can essentially put everything in as one,” Ely said. “As a handlebar light this may be the way to go.”

For commuters looking for a colorful “be seen” light at a reasonable pricepoint, NiteRider is introducing its Lightning Bugs, which will come in a plethora of colors and three different versions. Retail is $11 – $20. NiteRider will also have a new taillight called the Stinger, which is designed to fit aero posts as well. It will retail for $20.

“I’ve unofficially dubbed [our 2011 product line] as more bang for your buck,” Ely said.

NiteRider has increased its MiNewt Mini lumen output to 150 while lowering the retail from $99 to $89. The Plus version that comes with a helmet mount drops in price from $129 to $109.

“What we’ve done with this light, and with the whole line for that matter, is increase light output, increase features to nearly every light, while maintaining or decreasing both cost in retail to both the consumer and dealer,” Ely said.

Last year NiteRider had the MiNewt 200 ($199). For 2011 NiteRider is incorporating a quad multi-chip LED that now has 350 lumens, while the retail stays the same. “It’s like putting a V-8 into a Miata,” Ely said.

The dual version of the MiNewt (700 lumens) gets a facelift as well. “In the past the two headlamps have been hardwired together,” Ely said. “This year we’ve created a splitter cable, allowing you to use it as just a single. It gives you that flexibility of using it as a single or dual system.” Retail is $299.

All new product will be hitting retail by the end of July.

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